Friday, June 19, 2009

Obama says immigration overhaul is essential

President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the Esperanza National Hispanic
AP – President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the Esperanza National Hispanic Prayer Breakfast and Conference


WASHINGTON – President Barack Obama says he is committed to a comprehensive immigration overhaul that includes a way that illegal immigrants can become U.S. citizens.

Obama told a gathering of Hispanics on Friday that U.S. borders must be strengthened to thwart illegal immigration.

He said the millions of people who are now in the U.S. illegally should have the chance to become citizens. He said they must pay a fine and taxes, learn English and "go to the back of the line" of people trying to enter the United States from their home country.

He said employers should not be allowed to exploit illegal immigrants to drive down wages.

Obama made his remarks at the Esperanza National Hispanic Prayer Breakfast and Conference.


VIDEO

Thursday, June 18, 2009

ACLU, Ron Paul’s Campaign for Liberty sue TSA over ‘illegal’ detention





The American Civil Liberties Union may have just earned itself a few more Republican admirers.

Announcing a lawsuit against the Transportation Security Administration for the “illegal” detention of the Campaign for Liberty’s treasurer in April at a St. Louis airport, the ACLU damned what it called a “troubling pattern” of aggressive invasions of privacy by the TSA.

Steve Bierfeldt, the man at the center of the controversy, recorded his confrontation with the airport security agents on his phone. The audio caused waves of indignation across the Internet, as he was seemingly harassed merely for carrying cash and Ron Paul campaign material.

In it, he is clearly wary of the security agents and takes steps to ensure he says nothing to incriminate himself under questioning by the agents. He told journalists later that he was also fearful of the agents because of the so-called “Missouri memo” that, while retracted, branded Ron Paul supporters as potential “militia.”

The Campaign for Liberty was founded by Texas Republican Congressman Ron Paul, who attracted a groundswell of support during his failed bid for the GOP presidential nomination. Many of the group’s members were in St. Louis in early April for a major rally.

“Due to the current economical [sic] and political situation, a lush environment for militia activity has been created,” the retracted memo reads. It goes on to cite possible militia members as people who talk about the New World Order conspiracy, express anger with the Federal Reserve banking system, resist paying taxes, warn other citizens about the perceived dangers of radio frequency identification (RFID) or lobby for a return to strict constitutionalism as possible threats to law enforcement.

More than half of the U.S. House of Representatives have co-sponsored Congressman Ron Paul’s proposed legislation to audit the Federal Reserve. Hearings and debate on the bill by the full House are expected next month.

Along with specifically highlighting former presidential candidates Ron Paul, Chuck Baldwin and Bob Barr as icons of the militia movement, it also cautioned police to be on the lookout for bumper stickers advertising third party candidates, or people with copies of the United States Constitution. The Missouri Department of Public Safety later apologized profusely after the three men signed a letter demanding a retraction, and the state’s Lt. governor promised to look into the memo’s origins.

“Mr. Bierfeldt’s experience represents a troubling pattern of TSA attempting to transform its valid but limited search authority into a license to invade people’s privacy in a manner that would never be accepted outside the airport context,” said ACLU attorney Larry Schwartztol in a Thursday media advisory. “Just as the Constitution prevents the police on the street from conducting freewheeling searches in the hopes of uncovering wrongdoing, it protects travelers from the kind of treatment Mr. Bierfeldt suffered.”

The release adds: “TSA officials have the authority to conduct safety-related searches for weapons and explosives. According to the ACLU’s lawsuit, TSA agents are using heightened security measures after 9/11 as an excuse to exceed their search authority and engage in unlawful searches that violate the privacy rights of passengers. The lawsuit also charges that unconstitutional searches and detention by TSA agents have become the norm.”

The full press release follows.

####

NEW YORK – The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is subjecting innocent Americans to unreasonable searches and detentions that violate the Constitution, according to a lawsuit filed today by the American Civil Liberties Union. The ACLU filed the complaint on behalf of a traveler who was illegally detained and harassed by TSA agents at the airport for carrying approximately $4,700 in cash.

“Airport searches are the most common encounters between Americans and law enforcement agents. That’s why it is so important for TSA agents to do the job they were trained to do and not engage in fishing expeditions that do nothing to promote flight safety,” said Ben Wizner, a staff attorney with the ACLU National Security Project. “It is, of course, very important to ensure the safety of flights and keep illegal weapons and explosives off planes. But allowing TSA screeners to conduct general purpose law enforcement searches violates the Constitution while diverting limited resources from TSA’s core mission of protecting safety. For the sake of public safety and constitutional values, these unlawful searches should stop.”

On March 29, 2009, Steven Bierfeldt was detained in a small room at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport and interrogated by TSA officials for nearly half an hour after he passed a metal box containing cash through a security checkpoint X-ray machine. Bierfeldt was carrying the cash in connection with his duties as the Director of Development for the Campaign for Liberty, a political organization that grew out of Congressman Ron Paul’s presidential campaign.

Bierfeldt was detained and questioned as he returned home from a Campaign for Liberty event transporting proceeds from the sale of tickets, t-shirts, stickers and campaign material. Bierfeldt repeatedly asked the agents to explain the scope of their authority to detain and interrogate him and received no explanation. Instead, the agents escalated the threatening tone of their questions and ultimately told Bierfeldt that he was being placed under arrest. Bierfeldt recorded the audio of the entire incident with his iPhone.

“I do not believe I should give up my constitutional rights each time I choose to travel by plane. I was doing nothing illegal or suspicious, yet I was treated like a potential criminal and harassed for no reason,” said Bierfeldt. “Most Americans would be surprised to learn that TSA considers simply carrying cash to be a basis for detention and questioning. I hope the court makes clear that my detention by TSA agents was unconstitutional and stops TSA from engaging in these unlawful searches and arrests. I do not want another innocent American to have to endure what I went through.”

“Mr. Bierfeldt’s experience represents a troubling pattern of TSA attempting to transform its valid but limited search authority into a license to invade people’s privacy in a manner that would never be accepted outside the airport context,” said Larry Schwartztol, a staff attorney with the ACLU National Security Project. “Just as the Constitution prevents the police on the street from conducting freewheeling searches in the hopes of uncovering wrongdoing, it protects travelers from the kind of treatment Mr. Bierfeldt suffered.”

TSA officials have the authority to conduct safety-related searches for weapons and explosives. According to the ACLU’s lawsuit, TSA agents are using heightened security measures after 9/11 as an excuse to exceed their search authority and engage in unlawful searches that violate the privacy rights of passengers. The lawsuit also charges that unconstitutional searches and detention by TSA agents have become the norm.

The ACLU’s lawsuit was filed against Janet Napolitano, Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, which has authority over TSA. It was filed in federal court in Washington, D.C.

Attorneys on the case are Wizner, Scott Michelman and Allen Hopper of the ACLU, Art Spitzer of the ACLU National Capital Area and cooperating attorney Alan Gura of Gura and Possessky, P.L.L.C.

More information about the case, including the ACLU’s complaint and an audio recording of Bierfeldt’s detention and interrogation, is available online at: www.aclu.org/safefree/general/39922res20090618.html

Adam Kokesh Jason Bermas 06 17 09

http://api.ning.com/files/xNz07SmIDiGG8frz1gtqDgu7sislV0n9YdYt63VUocMsyqqkHcFvQCM2LcQNhzoxWgw9kTkSRTisxDrUC0tZ5Vzt3b8zKfod/images.jpg

06 17 09.mp3, 26.9 MB

Iraq war veteran and patriot Adam Kokesh joins Jason Bermas
to discuss his military experiences and his bid for a
Congressional seat representing New Mexico.

Adam Kokesh 4 Congress
Marine Corps War Veteran
and Patriot Needs Your Support !


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Kissinger threatens regime change in Iran if coup fails http://ffywp.tk

Gary Franchi Alex Jones Radio mp3 Show download june 18 2009



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Wednesday, June 17, 2009

U.S. Says Treasury Bonds Seized in Italy Are ‘Clearly Fakes’ June 17 (Bloomberg) -- U.S. government bonds found in the false bottom of a suitcase car

June 17 (Bloomberg) -- U.S. government bonds found in the false bottom of a suitcase carried by two Japanese travelers attempting to cross into Switzerland are fake, a Treasury spokesman said.

“They’re clearly fakes,” said Stephen Meyerhardt, a spokesman for the U.S. Bureau of the Public Debt in Washington. “That’s beyond the fact that the face value is far beyond what’s out there.”

Italy’s financial police last week said they asked the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to authenticate the seized bonds, with a face value of more than $134 billion. Colonel Rodolfo Mecarelli of the Guardia di Finanza in Como, Italy, said they were probably forgeries.

Meyerhardt said Treasury records show an estimated $105.4 billion in bearer bonds have yet to be surrendered. Most matured more than five years ago, he said. The Treasury stopped issuing bearer bonds in 1982, Meyerhardt said.

Had the notes been genuine, the pair would have been the U.S. government’s fourth-biggest creditor, ahead of the U.K. with $128 billion of U.S. debt and just behind Russia, which is owed $138 billion.

The bonds were seized in Chiasso, Italy.

To contact the reporters on this story: Vincent Del Giudice in Washington at vdelgiudice@bloomberg.net

Iran: various disturbing images and footages to have emerged today

Cath Brazier, has put together this video of various disturbing images and footages to have emerged today via social networking sites.


Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Cruise this - Coast Guard marksmen ready for SF Bay terrorism

Bee Staff

If terrorists attempt to take over a cruise ship or any other act on San Francisco Bay, they will be met with an armed response via helicopter in addition to surface ships.

The added security from the U.S. Coast Guard went into effect in February, according to a new release.

"Imagine a USS Cole-like attack on a cruise ship, on the San Francisco Bay ferry system, on our bridges," said Cmdr. Samuel Creech, commanding officer of Air Station San Francisco. "We want the opportunity to do more than shake our head and shake our fists..."

The station's MH-65 "Dolphin" helicopters can be equipped with M-14T rifles and machine guns, he said. The station has eight "highly trained gunners" available on short notice.

"The training make precise marksmen," said Petty Officer 1st Class Michael S. Conrad, who has been qualified as a marksmen since 2005 and is serving as an instructor. "Hopefully we will have to use the (marksmen), but I know that the right people are in place..."

DSC_0147b.jpg

Ohioans ticketed for parking in own driveways

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Residents of Toledo, Ohio, are complaining that they received $25 tickets for parking their vehicles in their own driveways.

Mayor Carty Finkbeiner (FINK'-by-ner) says he stands by the citations handed out last week by the Division of Streets, Bridges and Harbor. He says the tickets were issued under a city law against parking on unpaved surfaces, including gravel driveways.

During a news conference Monday, Finkbeiner ignored a reporter's question of whether the crackdown and fines were related to the city's budget crisis.

The three-term mayor faces a recall vote in November. Critics have claimed he's wasted city money.

City Councilman D. Michael Collins calls the ticketing "Mickey Mouse nonsense." He has told residents he'll try to have the citations rescinded.

Copy N' Paste News 061609

Ahmadinejad stresses need for a new world order

Guess the worth of Saudi King's golden gift to Obama

ABC Turns Programming over to Obama!!

Ohioans ticketed for parking in own driveways


BRUSSELS (AP) -- The European Union urged the United States on Wednesday to open talks on scrapping a ban on foreign online gambling companies, saying it breaks global trade rules.


"I Make Up Stories "Accused al Qaeda mastermind Khalid Sheik Mohammed complained that interrogators tortured lies out of him


Serpent Spy: Israel's New Robotic Snake


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Microsoft's security chief and a veteran of Clinton's and Bush's national security teams are leading candidates for cybersecurity czar, a job that needs White House access and clout to protect networks that underpin the U.S. economy.

No more anonymous blogging in the UK


Bloggers beware as judge says authors do NOT have right to anonymity on the web

In Opposition to People's Wishes, Obama to Give Fed MORE Power
http://z0a1l.tk

Western Hemisphere Travel Iniatiave - Propaganda / Commercial
http://bit.ly/haflT

Graphic - 7 Deadin Iran - Security Forces Opened Fire on Protesters
http://gi8du.tk

Pentagon wavers on release of report on Afghan attack
http://d8hdy.tk

Accused al Qaeda mastermind Khalid Sheik Mohammed complained that interrogators tortured lies out of him http://uwzhl.tk

Dr Ron Paul On Reforming Health Care http://leodf.tk

US Department of Defense now claims public protest is "low-level terrorism http://ycoma.tk

Nuclear blasts’ toll lingers for one man - vet recalls an X-ray experience in tests of nuclear blasts in 1950s
http://bsu53.tk

Ron Paul on Government Regulation Of Tobacco 6/12/09
http://7ozmy.tk


Tobacco regulation and free-speech

Homeland Security Drill (Red Dragon) on June 17, S.E. Wisconsin

Subpoena seeks names -- and lots more -- of Web posters

Gordon Brown puts Israel lobbyist in charge of Britain's Middle East policy

Pennsylvania man arrested, and convicted, for complaining too much about local government

Operation Would U Like Fries will target drunken driving by putting undercover deputies inside 24-hour fast-food restaurants to spot impaired drivers

Immigration officials detaining, deporting American citizens





Monday, June 15, 2009

Iranian Security Forces Opened Fire on Protesters Seven people killed

Iranian Security Forces Opened Fire
on Protesters Seven people killed

related:
Videos: Iran Erupts in Protests,

Violence on Ahmadinejad Election Win

Pentagon wavers on release of report on Afghan attack

WASHINGTON — Defense Department officials are debating whether to ignore an earlier promise and squelch the release of an investigation into a U.S. airstrike last month, out of fear that its findings would further enrage the Afghan public, Pentagon officials told McClatchy Monday.
The military promised to release the report shortly after the May 4 air attack, which killed dozens of Afghans, and the Pentagon reiterated that last week. U.S. officials also said they'd release a video that military officials said shows Taliban fighters attacking Afghan and U.S. forces and then running into a building. Shortly afterward, a U.S. aircraft dropped a bomb that destroyed the building.
However, a senior defense official told McClatchy Monday: "The decision (about what to release) is now in limbo."
Pentagon leaders are divided about whether releasing the report would reflect a renewed push for openness and transparency about civilian casualties or whether it would only fan Afghan outrage and become a Taliban recruiting tool just as Army Lt. Gen. Stanley McChrystal takes command of U.S. forces in Afghanistan .
Two U.S. military officials told McClatchy that the video shows that no one checked to see whether any women or children were in the building before it was bombed. The report acknowledges that mistakes were made and that U.S. forces didn't always follow proper procedures, but it does little to reassure Afghans that the U.S. has done enough to avoid repeating those mistakes.
During his Senate confirmation hearing earlier this month, McChrystal promised to review U.S tactics and what more could be done to minimize civilian casualties.
The chief investigator has briefed Defense Secretary Robert Gates on the report, and other top defense officials, including Navy Adm. Michael Mullen , the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, are reviewing an unclassified version of it for possible release.
The airstrike, in western Farah province, has drawn the ire of local and national leaders angered that U.S. forces may have killed as many as 140 civilians in pursuit of a band of Taliban fighters. Shortly after the attack, U.S. military officials told McClatchy that they thought the death toll had been roughly 50, some of them militants.
The U.S. use of airstrikes in Afghanistan , and the resulting civilian casualties and property damage, have strained relations between the U.S. and Afghanistan and become an issue in Afghanistan's August elections.
"The airstrikes are not acceptable," Afghan President Hamid Karzai said during his May visit to the U.S. "This is something that we've raised in the Afghan government very clearly, that terrorism is not in the Afghan villages, not in Afghan homes. And you cannot defeat terrorists by airstrikes."
Lacking sufficient forces to patrol the vast Afghan countryside, the U.S. has relied heavily on airstrikes. The seven-hour incident on May 4 began when Afghan police were ambushed while they were patrolling a road. Some officers were killed, prompting the police to call in the Afghan army. The army then came under attack, too, and the provincial governor called in U.S. forces.
The U.S. forces eventually called in air support, military officials said, and after the airstrike began, the Taliban moved into two remote villages separated by poppy fields that were a source of heavy enemy fire, and the fight continued into the night.
The U.S. dropped 13 bombs on some buildings, military officials in Afghanistan have said.
The report found that an Air Force B-1 bomber had to circle overhead before dropping a 2,000-pound bomb on a site where suspected Taliban fighters had fled. While it was circling, civilians could've entered the building or Taliban could've left, but the military had no one in a position to observe that.
"There's no way to determine whether or not that had anything to do with the fact that civilian casualties did occur in this incident, but they did note that as one of the problems associated with how this all took place," Pentagon spokesman Geoff Morrell said last week.
MORE FROM MCCLATCHY

Copy N' Paste News 061509

SAO PAULO (Reuters) – Charging that toys sold with meals in fast-food outlets can lead children to develop bad eating habits, a Brazilian prosecutor on Monday asked a judge to ban such sales nationally at chains including McDonald's and Burger King.

The move comes amid global concern over the link between some fast food and illnesses such as diabetes, as the U.S. Congress considers requiring chain restaurants to disclose calories on their menus to help fight endemic obesity.

Prosecutor Marcio Schusterschitz, a federal prosecutor in Brazil's Sao Paulo state, said fast-food toy promotions encourage children to buy high-fat meals through "the abusive creation of emotional associations" that turn them into life-long eaters of high-fat foods.


(AFP/File/Dave Clark)AFP - China's state oil firm SIPEC and Nigerian Petroleum Development Company (NPDC) have discovered crude oil from Niger Delta region of the west African nation, an official statement said.

Reuters - Canada's largest opposition party said on Monday it was prepared to bring down the government later this week unless it received details of planned improvements to the jobless benefits system.

Momentum builds for broad debate on legalizing pot
NEW YORK – The savage drug war in Mexico. Crumbling state budgets. Weariness with current drug policy. The election of a president who said, "Yes — I inhaled."

These developments and others are kindling unprecedented optimism among the many Americans who want to see marijuana legalized.

Judge says museum suspect can't appear in court
WASHINGTON – A white supremacist accused of fatally shooting a security guard at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum is in no condition to appear in court, a federal judge ruled Monday. James von Brunn, 88, was shot in the face by guards who returned his fire last week and is still hospitalized. FBI officials have said he is likely to survive.

Attorney defends trooper in Okla. ambulance stop
OKLAHOMA CITY – Bothered that an ambulance driver failed to yield to him as he raced to provide backup on a call — and angered further when he thought the driver flipped him an obscene gesture — state Trooper Daniel Martin decided to stop the ambulance and give the driver a piece of his mind.

What Martin didn't know then, his lawyer said Monday, was that there was a patient in the back of the ambulance.